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Article: It's Giving Versatility - The Pros of Using Wax Melts

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It's Giving Versatility - The Pros of Using Wax Melts

We post a lot about our wax melts but I've noticed a lot of folks still aren't sure exactly what they are, what they do and more importantly, what's so ~great~ about them. Let's get into it.

 Using homemade mini wax melts in aromatherapy lamp diffuser at home interior concept. Melts making ingredients on table for unbleached beeswax, solid coconut oil, essential oil, dried flowers.

Photo courtesy of FotoHelin

What are wax melts?

So first things first, what are wax melts? Wax melts are simply pieces of scented wax created for use in dedicated home wax warmers. The specific wax used vary from brand to brand but are usually made with naturally derived materials like coconut, beeswax, soy or food-grade paraffin. They are then blended with either essential oils, botanicals (flowers and herbs) or aroma oils crafted specifically for candle or tart wax. They come in countless varieties of shapes, sizes and scents but all do one thing - make your home smell bomb.

 

How do they work?

Wax melts work by slowly melting and releasing their scent into the air under the steady heat of a wax warmer, either electric with a bulb or tealight. Because there's no direct flame involved as with a candle, you typically enjoy a longer-lasting, purer scent experience without the same risks associated with an open flame candle. Depending on the wax used and amount of scent blended within, the scent strength will vary.

 Making of mini wax melts for aroma lamp diffuser at home concept. Tools ingredients on table unbleached beeswax, solid coconut oil, essential oil, dried flowers and plastic mold. Flat lay view.

Photo courtesy of FotoHelin

So what are the benefits?

Ah, yes - I'm glad you asked. Besides the fact that they're super inexpensive, I present the following:

  • No flame, no smoke, no soot.

As mentioned above, wax melts need no direct flame (except if you're using a tealight warmer, which works by utilizing the heat of a tealight beneath the wax dish. I don't recommend these but they're okay in a temporary pinch). Because there's no flame, you have zero smoke and zero sooting, which leads to a cleaner and safer home fragrance experience.

  • Scent type and scent strength is completely adjustable.

You're in control of what scent you want and how strong you want it. You have the flexibility of blending two or more scents together to create a whole new aromatic experience. And, if one or two pieces aren't giving you what you need, you can add in more for a stronger scent throw or swap it out altogether and replace with a new scent. Which brings us to my next point.

  • Easy disposal and storage.

    Once the scent has completely dissipated, all you have to do is carefully dispose of the unscented wax in the trash (never dispose down any drains or sinks!). Or, if you're in the habit of swapping out fragrances, it's as easy as popping it out the warmer dish and placing aside for later. There are wax melt liners that make this super easy, too, if you don't want to pour the wax back into certain containers like the popular clamshell ones you find in stores. 

    Additionally, because wax melts are typically smaller in size, they take up minimal space and are a breeze to store. They fit into drawers, baskets, bins and shelves, and depending on the container, are stackable, too.

     

    Using homemade mini wax melts in aromatherapy lamp diffuser at home interior concept. Melts making ingredients on table for unbleached beeswax, solid coconut oil, essential oil, dried flowers.

    Photo courtesy of FotoHelin

    Hmm, sounds lit. Where can I get some?

    We sell them here! Ours are handcrafted (by me :) ) with naturally-derived coconut wax and food-safe paraffin for durability and boost in scent retention. As always, all of our fragrances used are free of harmful phthalates, parabens and toxins to ensure a safe, clean "burning" experience.

    You can also find them in most stores that sell home goods in the candle aisle, or online by other handcrafters in a ton of different styles and scents. If you end up trying some, let us know! We love hearing about everyone's experiences.

     

     

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